Immanuel Kant as a Philosopher of Freedom

Last week, I met with the MVHS students to discuss Section 2 of The Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. We looked at the way Kant derived a “categorical imperative” from the idea that morality commands us categorically rather than hypothetically. For instance, morality says “do not murder,” not “if you don’t want to go to jail, do not murder.” […]

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A Good Will

One of the new readings we are doing for this year’s Ethics and Economics Challenge course is Immanuel Kant’s Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. Last week, I spoke with the students about the first part of this essay, and we discussed Kant’s conception of morality based on the good will. Kant says a good will is the only unconditionally […]

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Ethics & Economics Challenge Scholarship Winners Announced!

This year’s Ethics and Economics Challenge speech competition at Merrimack Valley High School, made possible by Credit Adjustments, Inc., took place on Friday evening, June 3. The students gave a series of excellent presentations, which were judged by Janine Casavant, Gardner Goldsmith, and Jason Sorens. In the end, the winners were: Braden S., for “Why College Vouchers Could Reduce Costs” […]

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Competition Among Politicians

Whom do you trust to tell the truth? A long-running survey by the British pollster Ipsos MORI asks respondents which occupations they trust the most to tell the truth. Doctors, teachers, judges, scientists, hairdressers, police, and clergy were the most trusted occupations. Politicians, government ministers, and journalists were among the least trusted occupations. Why do we trust politicians so little? […]

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